Recently Appointed Professors

A list of faculty members appointed by the December 15, 2016 Faculty of Medicine event are listed below.  For a complete listing of all appointed professors during a given academic year, please click here

As of December 14th, 2016

Karen Adelman, Ph.D.

Dr. Adelman is Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. Her work has revealed that a majority of metazoan gene regulation occurs during early transcription elongation, through controlled pausing of RNA polymerase II.  Her recent findings that pause release is a key determinant of gene activity (in response to developmental and environmental factors) has provided new insights into signal-responsive gene expression and its perturbation in cancer cells.

Thomas G. Bernhardt, Ph.D.

Dr. Bernhardt is Professor of Microbiology and Immunobiology at Harvard Medical School. His laboratory combines traditional and modern genetic approaches with biochemistry and cell biology to investigate how bacterial cells grow and divide. Work from his group has provided insight into the fundamental mechanisms underlying these processes and knowledge relevant to targeting them for antibiotic development.

Vincent J. Carey, Ph.D.

Dr. Carey is Professor of Medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  His research is divided between computational statistics for integrative genomics, and design and analysis of clinical trials in chronic and infectious diseases.  His innovative work as co-founder and core developer of “Bioconductor”, a novel open access platform for analysis of genomic data, has had an enormous impact on the work of genomic scientists worldwide.

Mariana C. Castells, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Castells is Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where she is the Director of the Hypersensitivity and Desensitization Center and the Associate Director of the Mastocytosis Center. Her research is focused on the inhibitory mast cell-dependent processes that lead to cell desensitization, which she has translated into clinical application for thousands of patients with cancer, inflammatory disease and severe infection who need first line therapy. Through desensitization protocols, cancer patients and patients suffering from inflammatory disease and severe infection have been able to increase their quality of life and their life expectancy.

Niteesh K. Choudhry, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Choudhry is Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where he is Executive Director of the Center for Healthcare Delivery Sciences.  His work focuses on design and evaluation of  strategies to overcome barriers to the broader use of evidence-based therapies.  His research on predictive analytic approaches and strategies to address medication non-adherence, in particular, has been widely adopted by health insurers and provider organizations throughout the U.S. and beyond.

Karen M. Cichowski, Ph.D.

Dr. Cichowski is Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and is the Associate Director of Planning and Evaluation for the Dana-Farber Harvard Cancer Center. She is an expert in deconstructing how deregulated signaling pathways drive cancer and uses this insight to discover new targeted therapies. Her work has led to the development of several ongoing clinical trials in currently untreatable Ras-driven cancers.

William C. Faquin, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Faquin is Professor of Pathology at Mass General Hospital and Director of Head and Neck Pathology at the Mass Eye and Ear.  He is a recognized leader in the field of head and neck cytopathology.  His work combining cytomorphology and ancillary markers has contributed to advancements in the detection and diagnosis of thyroid cancer by fine needle aspiration.

Robert C. Flaumenhaft, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Flaumenhaft is Professor of Medicine at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.  He is an internationally recognized expert in the area of platelet biology with a focus on platelet granule release and small molecule development in the area of thrombosis. His discovery programs have led to identifying new antithrombotic therapies, one of which is currently in advanced phase clinical trials.

Golby

Alexandra J. Golby, M.D.

Dr. Golby is Professor of Neurosurgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where she is the Co-Director of the Advanced Multi-modality Image Guided Operating Suite (AMIGO). Her clinical and research interests have focused on developing innovative imaging techniques to define critical brain structures and to guide intraoperative decision making for brain surgery.  Her work has contributed to the widespread adoption of functional neuronavigation in the care of patients suffering from brain tumors and other neurosurgical illnesses.

Allan M. Goldstein, M.D.

Dr. Goldstein is Professor of Surgery at Mass General Hospital where he is Chief of Pediatric Surgery and is also Surgeon-in-Chief at MassGeneral Hospital for Children. His clinical and research interests focus on neurointestinal diseases. His work has contributed to our understanding of how the enteric nervous system develops and how neuronal stem cells might be used as a cell-based therapy to treat Hirschsprung disease and other enteric neuropathies.

Annekathryn Goodman, M.D.

Dr. Goodman is Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology at Mass General Hospital.   She has completed training in both pastoral and palliative care and, as a member of the National Trauma and Critical Care Team, she has been deployed to various international disasters including Haiti in 2010 and Nepal in 2015.   Recently, she has been consulting in Bangladesh on cervical cancer prevention and the development of medical infrastructure to care for women with gyn cancers.

Timothy T. Hla, Ph.D.

Dr. Hla is Professor of Surgery in the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children’s Hospital.  His research has uncovered novel mechanisms by which lipid mediators such as sphingosine 1-phosphate and prostaglandins act.  His work has also described the role of such molecular mechanisms in diseases and has paved the way by which new anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory drugs are developed.

F. Stephen Hodi, M.D.

Dr. Hodi is Professor of Medicine at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.  He is a recognized leader in the development of treatments for malignant melanoma and immune therapies for cancer.  His work contributed to a new era of immune checkpoint blockade to treat melanoma and other cancers with emphasis in combined approaches.

Matthew H. Kulke, M.D., M.M.Sc.

Dr. Kulke is Professor of Medicine at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute where he founded and is currently the Director of the Program in Neuroendocrine Tumors at the Brigham and Womens/Dana-Farber. His work has shed light on the molecular characteristics of neuroendocrine tumors.  His research has led to the development of multiple new treatments for patients with this condition.

Ursula Matulonis, M.D.

Dr. Matulonis is Professor of Medicine at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and is the Medical Director and Disease Center Leader of the Gyn Oncology Program.   Her research focuses on developing targeted therapies for gyn cancers, with a specific interest in the genetic changes in ovarian cancer and how that can lead to rationale drug development and selection.  She is a recognized leader in the clinical development and testing of PARP inhibitors, and her work has contributed to the regulatory approval of PARP inhibitors to treat recurrent ovarian cancer in the United States and Europe.

Roy H. Perlis, M.D., M.Sc.

Dr. Perlis is Professor of Psychiatry at Mass General Hospital and is the Director of the MGH Center for Quantitative Health. He is a leader in the study of personalized medicine in psychiatric illness, and his laboratory pioneered the use of large-scale electronic health records to drive clinically-relevant risk stratification in psychiatry. His team identified the first genes associated with risk for major depression.

Scott H. Podolsky, M.D.

Dr. Podolsky is Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School and is also the Director of the Center for the History of Medicine at the Countway Medical Library.  In addition, he a primary care physician at the MGH. He is a historian of medicine, using social historical methods to frame contemporary medical and scientific concerns such as his monograph on The Antibiotic Era: Reform, Resistance, and the Pursuit of a Rational Therapeutics.

David A. Reardon, M.D.

Dr. Reardon is Professor of Medicine at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute where he is the Clinical Director of the Center for Neuro-Oncology.  His research has focused on the development of novel therapeutic approaches for brain cancer patients.  Specifically his work has included a broad array of preclinical mechanistic and efficacy studies in brain cancer models that have rapidly translated to the clinic for the evaluation of multiple novel therapeutic approaches, with a major emphasis on immunomodulatory reagents.

 

Joan Y. Reede, M.D., M.S., M.P.H., M.B.A

Dr. Reede is Professor of Medicine at Mass General Hospital and is the inaugural Dean for Diversity and Community Partnership at Harvard Medical School. Her primary focus is workforce, mentoring and leadership development in the biomedical sciences and health policy. She has designed, developed, directed and continues to lead a multi-faceted portfolio of innovative programs that support and shape the career development of faculty, trainees and students at HMS, nationally and internationally.

David P. Ryan, M.D., M.M.S.

Dr. Ryan is Professor of Medicine at Mass General Hospital where he is Chief of Hematology-Oncology and Clinical Director of the MGH Cancer Center.  His clinical and research activities have focused on gastrointestinal malignancies where he is a clinical trialist and a recognized leader in the field.

John R. Saltzman, M.D.

Dr. Saltzman is Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital where he is the Director of Endoscopy and the Advanced Endoscopy Fellowship Program.  He is a recognized leader and innovator in advanced endoscopic procedures.  His research has led to new approaches to the evaluation, management and therapy of patients with upper GI bleeding.

Navil F. Sethna, M.B.Ch.B.

Dr. Sethna is Professor of Anaesthesia at Boston Children’s Hospital and director of the Mayo Family Pediatric Pain Rehabilitation Center. His clinical and research interests have focused on management of acute and chronic pain disorders in children. He has established a unique specialized interdisciplinary pediatric pain rehabilitation program and his clinical research is focused on studies of quantitative sensory testing in children.

William M. Shih, Ph.D.

Dr. Shih is Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. His research explores design principles for self-assembling molecular machines, using DNA nanostructures as a model system. He is currently focused on building tools for molecular biophysics and tools for diagnostics and therapeutics.

David K. Simon, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Simon is Professor of Neurology at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where he is Director of the Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorders Center and Chief of the Movement Disorders Division. He conducts laboratory research as well as clinical trials relating to neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease. His work has advanced our understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA mutations in Parkinson’s disease.

Lawrence L. Wald, Ph.D.

Dr. Wald is Professor of Radiology at Mass General Hospital where he is the Director of the NMR Core Facility.  Dr. Wald is a specialist in MRI instrumentation and acquisition methods.  His work has led to new MRI detector arrays and methods to speed up and improve diagnostic imaging with MRI.

Loren Walensky, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Walensky is Professor of Pediatrics at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Director of the Harvard/MIT MD-PhD Program.  His research focuses on dissecting and targeting the protein interaction mechanisms of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, with the goal of developing a new class of cancer therapeutics called “stapled peptides”, one of which is currently undergoing clinical testing. He is also deeply committed to pediatric oncology care and to training the next generation of physicians and scientists. 

Benjamin C. Warf, M.D.

Dr. Warf is Professor of Neurosurgery at Boston Children's Hospital, where he is the Director of Neonatal and Congenital AnomalyNeurosurgery. He identified neonatal ventriculitis as the chief cause of infant hydrocephalus in East Africa and pioneered a novel endoscopic method for treating infant hydrocephalus that avoids the use of shunts, for which he was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship. He has trained neurosurgeons across North America and throughout the developing world and his current work focuses on hydrocephalus treatment and preventing post-infectious hydrocephalus in sub-Saharan Africa.

Jing Zhou, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Zhou is Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and is the founding director of the Harvard Center for Polycystic Kidney Disease Research.  Her research is focused on answering fundamental research questions related to inherited kidney diseases such as Alport syndrome and Polycystic Kidney Disease.  The results of her work have opened new avenues for research relating to kidney diseases, the polycystin protein family, epithelial cell biology and the biology of primary cilia.

Andrew X. Zhu, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Zhu is Professor of Medicine at MassGeneral Hospital where he is Director of Liver Cancer Research.  He has focused on developing innovative therapies for hepatobiliary cancers, identifying novel molecular markers and genetic mutations, and dissecting the molecular mechanism of drug resistance to targeted therapy.  His work has contributed to improving the therapeutic strategies for hepatobiliary cancers.

Peter J. Zimetbaum, M.D.

Dr.  Zimetbaum is Professor of Medicine at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center where he is Associate Chief and Director of Clinical Cardiology. His research focuses on the assessment of clinical practice strategies for cardiac arrhythmias.  His clinical and administrative responsibilities include developing novel methods for the ambulatory management of patients with cardiovascular disease.